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Temperament

The Tibetan Mastiff is courageous, fearless, even-tempered, calm and thoughtful. Very loyal to its own family. Tends to bark at night if left outside, but will be quiet indoors. It is an outstanding flock guardian and is ferocious against wolves, leopards or any prey that try to approach its flock. It is easy to housebreak, but matures later in life than the average breed. The Tibetan Mastiff needs a firm, confident, consistent pack leader to prevent it from becoming willful and stubborn, overprotective and territorial. These dogs have a strong desire to please their owners. They are loving with children, but can distrust and be reserved with strangers if not properly socialized. It comes naturally to this Mastiff to guard its family and their property. It has to be raised to adulthood in a careful, well-balanced manner. A stable, well-adjusted and trained dog is for the most part generally good with non-canine pets. It is possible for them to get along with other dogs if the owners are able to communicate with them that fighting is an unwanted behavior. Tibetan Mastiffs will not listen if they sense that they are stronger minded than their owners. Owners need to possess a natural air of authority to their demeanor. The objective in training this dog is to achieve pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in its pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperates under a single leader. Lines are clearly defined and rules are set. Because a dog communicates his displeasure with growling and eventually biting, all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. The humans must be the ones making the decisions, not the dogs. That is the only way your relationship with your dog can be a complete success. When owners make it absolutely clear they are alpha over the dog in a calm, but very firm manner, and the dog is well exercised, trained and socialized, it can be a very good family companion. This breed requires an experienced owner.

Height, Weight

Height: 25 - 28 inches (61- 71 cm)
Weight: 140 - 170 pounds (64 - 78 kg) Some European owners claim the dogs can weigh up to 220 pounds (99 kg), but the vast majority of these dogs have a weight that falls in the range stated above.

Health Problems

Prone to hip dysplasia, thyroid problems, skin conditions and ear infections. Also a genetic problem called Canine Inherited Demyelinative Neuropathy (CIDN), which is fatal. The disorder will be evident in puppies between 7 and 10 weeks of age and the pup will pass away by 4 months of age.

Living Conditions

The Tibetan Mastiff can live in an apartment life if it is very well exercised. These dogs are not very active indoors.

Exercise

The Tibetan Mastiff needs to be taken on daily walks. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Be careful that the bones, muscles and joints of the young dog are not overworked during the growing stage by not overdoing the physical side of its life. However, they will still need to walk each day to satisfy their migration instinct.

Life Expectancy

About 12 or more years.

Litter Size

An average of 5 - 12 puppies. Tibetan Mastiff dams typically go into heat only once a year, whereas most other dogs go into heat twice a year.

Grooming

The Tibetan Mastiff should be brushed regularly. In the winter the coat has an abundance of very thick hair, which sheds once a year for the duration of a month, when the weather gets warmer. During this time your dog should be brushed and combed every day. The Tibetan Mastiff is sometimes good for allergy sufferers, depending on the individual and the type of allergy they have.